A boatload of thanks



To the Editor:

The Acadia National Park staff wishes to express our sincerest thanks to Diver Ed Monat and Edna Martin for their hard work and attention to detail during their role in the cleanup of the wreckage from the sinking of Tiger Shark.

Although many of us were aware of their deep appreciation and admiration for park and the area’s resources, the handful of us who had the opportunity to work with them during the cleanup effort got to experience it first-hand. Their task was tedious, back-breaking and hazardous, but the two completed the cleanup through their sheer determination, optimism and concern.

When the vessel grounded and subsequently broke up along the rocky shoreline near Thunder Hole, the park staff was concerned about its impacts to the environment, to the scenery and to the visitor experience.

Ed and Edna worked with park staff to ensure the cleanup plan caused minimal interference with visitation and had no negative impact on the park’s natural and scenic resources. The effort required them to cut the debris from the 50-foot boat into 2-3 foot lengths and hand carry the wreckage over the rocky shoreline and up to the roadway.

Adding to that daunting task was the foul weather we have received over the past two weeks. The two worked through a series of rainstorms and through periods of high, rough seas. The wind, waves and tide constantly moved the wreckage about, eventually wedging between the boulders where many of the pieces had to be cut to be dislodged. Several times, Diver Ed donned his diving gear and braved the wave-battered shoreline to cut up and remove sections of boat from below the water’s edge.

When the grounding site was too dangerous to work, Ed and Edna patrolled Sand Beach, removing potentially hazardous wreckage debris obscured within the line of seaweed on the beach. Their thoroughness undoubtedly saved some unsuspecting beachgoer a rusty nail in the foot.

When they began the cleanup, the task seemed almost overwhelming. Day after day, the staging piles of debris grew, and from sunup to sundown, Ed and Edna worked day after soggy day, attentively removing even the smallest of wires from the shoreline.

The park staff and its visitors appreciate their heroic efforts and their concern for the park’s resources. And now that the task is nearing completion, we all benefit from your hard work. Thank you! Thank you!

Stuart West, Chief Ranger

Jason Flynn, Park Ranger

Acadia National Park

Although many of us were aware of their deep appreciation and admiration for park and the area’s resources, the handful of us who had the opportunity to work with them during the cleanup effort got to experience it first-hand. Their task was tedious, back-breaking and hazardous, but the two completed the cleanup through their sheer determination, optimism and concern.

When the vessel grounded and subsequently broke up along the rocky shoreline near Thunder Hole, the park staff was concerned about its impacts to the environment, to the scenery and to the visitor experience.

Ed and Edna worked with park staff to ensure the cleanup plan caused minimal interference with visitation and had no negative impact on the park’s natural and scenic resources. The effort required them to cut the debris from the 50-foot boat into 2-3 foot lengths and hand carry the wreckage over the rocky shoreline and up to the roadway.

Adding to that daunting task was the foul weather we have received over the past two weeks. The two worked through a series of rainstorms and through periods of high, rough seas. The wind, waves and tide constantly moved the wreckage about, eventually wedging between the boulders where many of the pieces had to be cut to be dislodged. Several times, Diver Ed donned his diving gear and braved the wave-battered shoreline to cut up and remove sections of boat from below the water’s edge.

When the grounding site was too dangerous to work, Ed and Edna patrolled Sand Beach, removing potentially hazardous wreckage debris obscured within the line of seaweed on the beach. Their thoroughness undoubtedly saved some unsuspecting beachgoer a rusty nail in the foot.

When they began the cleanup, the task seemed almost overwhelming. Day after day, the staging piles of debris grew, and from sunup to sundown, Ed and Edna worked day after soggy day, attentively removing even the smallest of wires from the shoreline.

The park staff and its visitors appreciate their heroic efforts and their concern for the park’s resources. And now that the task is nearing completion, we all benefit from your hard work. Thank you! Thank you!

Stuart West, Chief Ranger

Jason Flynn, Park Ranger

Acadia National Park

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