Maritime Shorts



Elver season 

BAR HARBOR — Due to ongoing concerns regarding COVID-19 transmission, the 2021 elver season will be conducted in the same manner as the 2020 season. Specifically, licensed elver harvesters may again fish for and sell the quota of another licensed harvester, provided they follow the necessary protocols. This is authorized by an Executive Order signed by Governor Mills earlier this week. 

Individual license holders may allow another license holder to catch their quota for them. If a license holder chooses to allow another license holder to fish for them, the license holder who is fishing must have the license and swipe card in their possession. 

A license holder may allow another license holder to sell their quota for them. If a license holder chooses to allow another license holder to sell for them, the license holder who is selling must also have the license and swipe card in their possession. 

The license holder who is fishing and/or selling may fish/sell for any number of other license holdershowever, they may not take, possess or sell more pounds of elvers than the combined quota of the license holder(s) for whom they are fishing and/or selling. 

In addition, all harvesters are expected to maintain social distancing (minimum of 6 feet of separation) at all times (fishing and selling), spread out fishing effort on the rivers to the greatest degree possible and fish as close to home as practical to avoid traveling throughout the state. 

Elver dealers are expected to comply with protocols for elver sales transactions that are designed to minimize the risk of the spread of COVID-19 and are consistent with CDC guidelines. These include limiting each transaction to one pound or more. This will eliminate hundreds of transactions over the course of the season and further reduce the potential to spread the virus.  

Maine Marine Patrol will monitor the fishery. 

 

Stories from the sea 

GLOUCESTER, MASS. — The Voices Oral History Archives (VOHA) seeks to document the human experience as it relates to the changing environment, climate, oceans and coasts through firsthand oral history accounts. It recently visited a fishing village in Massachusetts.  

Twelve men and women who call Gloucester’s working waterfront home were interviewed as part of the “Strengthening Community Resilience in America’s Oldest Seaport” project.  

From changes in fish populations and fishing regulations to gentrification and mental health struggles, the past several decades changed the Gloucester fishing community. Many of the men and women interviewed in this project grew up in Gloucester, witnessing these changes first-hand. 

For more informationvisit voices.nmfs.noaa.gov. 

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