Learn what it takes to be a national library



The Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress. The library is the topic of a talk by former administrator Charles Stanhope at the Southwest Harbor Public Library on April 12. PHOTO COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The Main Reading Room of the Library of Congress. The library is the topic of a talk by former administrator Charles Stanhope at the Southwest Harbor Public Library on April 12.
PHOTO COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

SOUTHWEST HARBOR — Charles Stanhope, former employee of the Library of Congress and current chair of the Southwest Harbor Public Library board, will describe the history and scope of responsibilities of the Library of Congress, the world’s largest library, when he speaks in the Holmes Room of the library here on Tuesday, April 12, at 5:30 p.m. His presentation is in honor of the 2016 National Library Week, the theme of which is “Libraries Transform.”

Over his 35-year career – from a processing technician to an assistant chief operating officer – Stanhope saw how the many diverse parts of the Library of Congress worked together. His conversation will touch on the library’s history and its public services in reading rooms and in libraries across the country and the world. The Library directly supports the Congress and the government, it provides resources to its citizens on their portable devices, and it collects the creative output of the American people. The library’s collections come from around the world and there is an active and on-going digitization effort to provide access to its unique collection items.

Stanhope retired from his public service career at the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution, the Library of Congress. He served the library as assistant chief operating officer, working on executive matters of congressional, legal and public affairs, as well as private sector fundraising and donor cultivation. These responsibilities supported the library’s well-regarded exhibit, literary and poetry program, including the activities of the U.S. poet laureate. He is especially proud to have served on the library team that designed and established the National Book Festival, which annually draws over 150,000 lovers of books and reading to the National Mall.

Call the library at 244-7065.

 

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