PHOTO COURTESY OF HCTPR

Hancock County Trustees donate remaining land



THE LAST PIECE OF THE PUZZLE … The Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations was formed in 1901 on Mount Desert Island to acquire lands for free public use. Empowered by the Maine Legislature in 1903 to own lands of “scenic beauty, historical significance, scientific study or sanitary value,” the trustees acquired nearly 5,000 acres. In 1916, they donated their holdings to the United States, forming the core of what is now Acadia National Park. On Monday, the trustees formally donated its last remaining two-acre parcel to the park. Presenting the deed, above, to Acadia Superintendent Kevin Schneider, left, is trustees President Terry Carlisle of Ellsworth. The Hancock County Trustees of Public Reservations continue to hold and maintain the Woodlawn estate and Black House as a public museum in Ellsworth.

ISLANDER PHOTO BY DICK BROOM

ISLANDER PHOTO BY DICK BROOM

Also on Monday, above, a group of historians and descendants of Acadia National Park’s founders pose at St. Saviour’s Church in Bar Harbor after reading speeches originally given 100 years ago at the opening of Acadia’s predecessor, Sieur de Monts National Monument. They are, from left, Jack Russell, William Horner, Rev. Timothy Fleck, Charles Eliot Pierce Jr., Ronald Epp and Steven Katona.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.