Pianist Edward Picton-Turbervill will perform at College of the Atlantic on Oct. 27. PHOTO COURTESY OF COLLEGE OF THE ATLANTIC

Picton-Turbervill to play Goldberg Variations



BAR HARBOR — Classical pianist Edward Picton-Turbervill will perform J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, in College of the Atlantic’s Gates Community Center on Friday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m. The performance, to be preceded by a presentation on the composition and creation of the famous piece, is free and open to the public.

The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, written for harpsichord by Johann Sebastian Bach, consist of an aria and a set of 30 variations. First published in 1741, the work is considered to be one of the most important examples of variations of form, according to a press release.

Picton-Turbervill was a chorister at Winchester Cathedral and then went on to Eton College, where he was awarded both academic and music scholarships. As organ scholar of St John’s College Cambridge, he played for numerous live broadcasts both in the U.K. and abroad, recorded three CDs, premiered works by Nico Muhly, Michael Finnissy and Francis Pott, and performed in some of the major international concert halls, including the Herkulessaal in Munich, the Esplanade in Singapore and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam.

In his final year at Cambridge, he was awarded the fellowship of the Royal College of Organists and graduated with a double first in music. Picton-Turbervill’s last CD with the choir of St John’s College, “Deo,” was editor’s choice in “Gramophone” and “BBC Music Magazine” Choral Disc of the Year.

After completing his bachelor’s, he stayed on at Cambridge to read for a master’s in environmental policy, supported by a benefactor’s scholarship from St John’s.

Picton-Turbervill is active as both a writer and composer: he has had music premiered on BBC Radio 3, and his first book, “Talking through Trees,” was published last year by the Old Stile Press, with woodcuts by Angela Lemaire. He has just finished a year studying German at the University of Heidelberg and is in Bar Harbor until December writing and composing.