Nature

  • Nature: Blooming flower list keeps getting longer

    Nature: Blooming flower list keeps getting longer

    Here on Mount Desert Island, seeing an eagle is special, but not unusual. Adult eagles are very beautiful and are here throughout the year. Their size is impressive, with a wingspread of 6 to 7 1/2 feet. Eagles are mainly fish eaters. They let other birds, like osprey, catch the fish and then they steal it by making the other bird drop it. Eagles can catch fish on their own, but they prefer letting other birds do the work. Although not elegant, eagles will also be happy with finding and eating dead fish and even roadkill.  

  • Nature: Tide pools are nature’s treasure chests

    Nature: Tide pools are nature’s treasure chests

    Walking along the shore and beaches on Mount Desert Island at any time of year is always exciting and you just never do know what you might find washed in from far away. Shells are always of interest. After a storm is a good time to look for something unusual, dead or alive. A tide pool is always a treasure chest of interesting creatures and plants.  

  • Nature: Are feeders for the birds?

    Nature: Are feeders for the birds?

    Bird feeders provide so much pleasure for so many people all over the world. Feeders are not really as important to the birds as one would think, except in severe weather conditions. But feeders do provide pleasure for the humans watching and they are educational for all ages who might not get out in woods and fields and notice the world around them. 

  • Nature: Frankly, my dear, blue jays are quite something 

    Nature: Frankly, my dear, blue jays are quite something 

    None other than the blue jay can be described as bold, brash and beautiful — a feathered Rhett Butler in blue and white. (Who knows that name anymore?) This is a northern bird and often seen here on MDI year-round. It is one that easily rivals in looks any bird found in the tropics. Most of us forget about that. A birding friend visiting me from England brought that to my attention when she first caught sight of a blue jay and said, “Ruth, what was THAT beautiful bird?” I answered, “Oh, that’s just a blue jay.”  

  • Nature: Treasure is under our feet

    Nature: Treasure is under our feet

    April is a month full of wildlife stirrings and plant life awakenings after the long, cold winter. Just being outside is a new adventure not to be missed! Watch for new flowers every day along the road, even in the ditches. Don’t miss the coltsfoot that looks a lot like a dandelion at first glance. Coltsfoot flowers bloom before the leaves. 

  • Nature: Raccoons tend to overstay their welcome 

    Nature: Raccoons tend to overstay their welcome 

    You may rue the day you decide to lure them in with food, for one or two raccoons quickly become a crowd. Getting them to come is very easy but getting them to move along is almost impossible. I had a good friend in Manset who welcomed them generously, but after awhile she had them climbing on her roof and tapping on her bedroom window for service. Another friend, also in Manset, who treated the local raccoons to goodies, came home one night to discover that they had gotten into the house and were not wanting to leave.