PHOTO COURTESY OF SWH LIBRARY

The Fire of ‘47 in fact and fiction



SOUTHWEST HARBOR – Suspense novelist Matty Dalrymple and historian Sean Cox will discuss “Fact and Fiction: The Fire of ’47” at the Southwest Harbor Public Library on Tuesday, August 14, 5:30-7:00 p.m.

Dalrymple will read from her suspense novel, “The Sense of Reckoning,” which is set on Mount Desert Island at the time of the fire. The book is part of a series featuring the character Ann Kinnear.

Matty Dalrymple PHOTO COURTESY OF SWH LIBRARY

Cox will use historical documents and photographs to illustrate the tremendous destruction resulting from the devastating blaze that burned over 17,000 acres on MDI.

“Her depiction of the great Bar Harbor fire of 1947 is so exactly and emotionally rendered, I could feel the blasts of heat from the pages,” author and screenwriter Robert Blake Whitehill said of ‘The Sense of Reckoning.’ It rivals Norman MacLean’s smoke-jumper classic, ‘Young Men and Fire,’ for poetic detail.”

Signed copies of Dalrymple’s book will be available after the talk.

Dalrymple is the author of the Ann Kinnear suspense novels “The Sense of Death” and “The Sense of Reckoning” and the Ann Kinnear suspense shorts, including “Close These Eyes” and “May Violets Spring.” Another series of thrillers, featuring a character named Lizzy Ballard, include “Rock Paper Scissors” and “Snakes and Ladders.”

She lives in Chester County, Penn. and is a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, International Thriller Writers, and the Brandywine Valley Writers Group.

Cox is a graduate of the University of Maine at Orono, with a BA in American History. He grew up in Bar Harbor and spent six seasons as an interpretive ranger in Acadia National Park. His is undergraduate thesis is titled “Acadia National Park and the Efforts of George Bucknam Dorr: How the Preservation Frontier Moved East and the Challenges for Acadia’s Second Century.”

Sean is an Honors Associate at UMaine, assisting and teaching for the Honors College. He plans to pursue a Ph.D. in Environmental History.

Contact the library at 244-7065.