PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JESUP

Jesup names Brechlin October featured artist



PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JESUP

A one-hour time exposure at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park created this image during last year’s Acadia Night Sky Festival.

BAR HARBOR — Bar Harbor’s final First Friday Art Walk of the year takes place on Oct. 3, and Mount Desert Islander Editor Earl Brechlin will be the featured artist at the Jesup Memorial Library. Brechlin will greet visitors at a reception in the Gladys Franklin O’Neil Periodicals Room that night from 6-9 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

Brechlin has been photographing Mount Desert Island and Maine as a journalist and outdoorsman for more than 35 years. A Registered Maine Guide and author of four Maine and New England history books based on antique postcards, as well as Maine and MDI adventure guides, he says finding new ways to capture scenes or events that have been covered dozens of times before is the greatest challenge. After two decades of working in black and white, color moved into the fore as newspapers began running full color photos. Earl notes that, “When you’ve seen something 100 times, the secret is to look at it in different light. I’m constantly amazed how your perception can change.”

Toward that end, he seldom takes his camera out during the middle of the day. “I like shooting at night, early in the morning, in the fog, the rain and the snow, when no one else is crazy enough to be out there.”

He likes to zoom in to capture a subject’s essence, while at the same time experimenting with hours-long exposures to compress time. He uses the latest software to blend scores of shots in panoramas that convey the true majesty of Acadia’s beauty.

“In photo journalism, there often is only one chance to get ‘the money shot,’ Brechlin explains. “The same holds true in nature. In both, there is an element of serendipity, a point at which the light, settings, angle, composition, timing – and just luck – click. There’s a difference between taking a photograph and making one.”

Brechlin’s advice to any budding photographer is simple: Keep your camera with you every minute of the day and night. Take it off automatic and begin to understand the subtle relationship between shutter and aperture. Pay attention to where the light is and when it is best. Let it work for you.

His work will remain on display at the Jesup throughout the month of October.

Call the library at 288-4245 or email [email protected]

Fenceviewer Staff

Fenceviewer Staff

Fenceviewer Staff

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