Articles by: Anne Kozak

Anne Kozak

Anne Kozak

Contributer at Mount Desert Islander
Anne teaches writing at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor.
  • Bio Lab celebrates banner year

    Bio Lab celebrates banner year

    BAR HARBOR — In opening the annual meeting, board Chair Peter Allen called the MDI Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) faculty the “real meat of the organization. Their peer-reviewed grant funding is remarkable; the science stood up to the challenges of peer review and is a tribute to their hard work, brilliance and ingenuity.” MDIBL President Kevin

  • New chair takes reins at FOA

    New chair takes reins at FOA

    BAR HARBOR— After six years as chair of the board of Friends of Acadia, Ed Samek, FOA’s longest-serving board chair, is passing the gavel to Anne Green, who for the last four years chaired FOA’s development committee. She also was co-chair of the successful $25 million second century capital campaign Both the incoming and outgoing

  • FOA celebrates year of successes

    FOA celebrates year of successes

    BAR HARBOR — In his opening remarks at Friends of Acadia’s annual meeting last week, outgoing board Chair Ed Samek credited the effectiveness of Friends of Acadia’s initiatives to a team effort and called 2016 – Acadia’s centennial and FOA’s 30th anniversary – the best of times. While some were concerned that nothing could match

  • David Rockefeller Sr.: Philanthropist, conservationist dies

    David Rockefeller Sr.: Philanthropist, conservationist dies

    MOUNT DESERT — Longtime Seal Harbor summer resident David Rockefeller Sr. died in his sleep at his Pocantico Hills, N.Y., home on Monday, March 20, at the age of 101. Rockefeller was born in Manhattan on June 12, 1915, the youngest child of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and the grandson of

  • Evans book profiles lab commitment

    Evans book profiles lab commitment

      BAR HARBOR — Author David Evans’ new book, “Marine Physiology Down East,” provides an important window into the commitment and collegiality of the many scientists who, for over a century, wrote grants and sought other funding to ensure the long-term viability of the MDI Biological Laboratory (MDIBL). Although the lab was founded in 1898,

  • Strange to step down in 2018

    Strange to step down in 2018

    BAR HARBOR — At last week’s annual meeting of the MDI Biological Laboratory (MDIBL), President Kevin Strange announced that he plans to step down in 2018. Both Strange and board Chairman Peter Allen said the focus over the next few years is to continue to position the lab to be sustainable. “The board asked Kevin

  • Gifts fund Acadia’s Trails Forever

    In July 1999, then-Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt announced a second public-private partnership, one he called a landmark initiative – a $13 million project to restore and reopen hiking trails in Acadia National Park. Like the carriage roads, many of these had not been well maintained because of a lack of funds and staff.

  • FOA honors Horner, Russell

    FOA honors Horner, Russell

    Cookie Horner and Jack Russell received the Marianne Edwards award, FOA’s highest award, for their efforts in spearheading the Acadia Centennial task force. In previous years, FOA has given awards for volunteerism, community preservation and conservation, as well as the Marianne Edwards award, but as FOA President David MacDonald noted Horner and Russell embodied the

  • Acadia’s ‘Friends’ steadfast for 30 years

    Acadia’s ‘Friends’ steadfast for 30 years

    BAR HARBOR — While the needs Friends of Acadia (FOA) addressed in its first 25 years involved successful and compelling initiatives – the Island Explorer, Carriage Road Restoration project and Acadia Trials Forever – the challenges now are less tangible and more societal, said FOA president David MacDonald. Today FOA, Acadia National Park and its

  • Carriage roads opened up Acadia’s interior

    Carriage roads opened up Acadia’s interior

    In her book “Mr. Rockefeller’s Roads,” Ann Roberts Rockefeller called the collaboration between her grandfather and Acadia co-founder George B. Dorr “remarkable.” Each,” she wrote, “played a critical role in the development of Acadia National Park and the carriage roads, and neither could have succeeded alone. Dorr provided the political skills to complement Rockefeller’s money,