Maine crime author visits Jesup



Crime writer Kate Flora will visit the Jesup Memorial Library to discuss her books on June 11. Her latest novel, “And Grant You Peace,” won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Crime Fiction. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JESUP

Crime writer Kate Flora will visit the Jesup Memorial Library to discuss her books on June 11. Her latest novel, “And Grant You Peace,” won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Crime Fiction.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE JESUP

BAR HARBOR — Award-winning Maine writer Kate Flora will be a the Jesup Memorial Library to discuss her newest books on Thursday, June 11, at 7 p.m. Flora brings her real life background as a former assistant attorney general in the Maine attorney general’s office, protecting battered kids, chasing deadbeat dads and representing the Human Rights Commission to her mystery and true crime novels. She is the author of 14 books, her most recent novel, “And Grant You Peace,” is a 2015 Maine Literary Award Winner for Crime Fiction.

“And Grant You Peace” is the fourth book in Flora’s Portland-based Joe Burgess series. The book follows Burgess, a police detective, as he begins an investigation into the death of an infant after a mother and her child are found locked in the closet of a burning mosque. Booklist notes, “The pleasure is in getting to spend time with Joe and his cop chums … it’s the richness of characterization, the refreshing dialogue and startling good writing that recommend Flora’s novel. Tension? Suspense? Bloody violence? That’s there, too, if you want.”

Flora’s most recent nonfiction work, “Death Dealer: How Cops and Cadaver Dogs Brought a Killer to Justice,” follows the case of a missing woman from Miramichi, New Brunswick. The police believe that her husband is involved with her disappearance and might also be a serial killer, but without a body they cannot prove his guilt. Flora follows the case as the Maine Warden Service and their trained cadaver dogs are called in to help the search for a body. Flora explains that while she has written two nonfiction books, these are often the hardest to write. “It’s hard and demanding and requires that I spend long periods of time thinking about real crime victims. It also takes at least twice as long as fiction,” she says. “I worked on ‘Death Dealer,’ through appeals, retrial and appeals, for over five years.”

Flora’s books include seven Thea Kozak mysteries, four Joe Burgess police procedurals, a suspense thriller written under the name Katharine Clark and two true crime books. Flora is also an Edgar Award nominee, an Agatha Award nominee and a 2013 Maine Literary Award Winner for Crime Fiction.